Community, police together must solve neighborhood problem

Shoes. “I don’t know what it feels like to walk in your shoes. I don’t know what it feels like to wake up every morning and kiss the people you love, knowing that your job can put you in grave danger. I don’t know what it feels like to be tasked with making split-second decisions that can change or end a person’s life.

"But I know what it feels like to walk in my shoes. And my hope is that I can talk to you about my shoes, and, in exchange, maybe you trust me to talk about your shoes; and we will find a way to come together on a journey that will connect us on a trusting path.”


THE POWER OF PARTNERSHIP


H.E.A.T. SYMPOSIUM TRAINING VIDEOS

Love & Justice Symposium 2017: Welcome

Love & Justice Symposium 2017: Sol Development Concert

Love & Justice Symposium 2017: Building Internal Alignment

Love & Justice Symposium 2017: Debrief and Report

Love & Justice Symposium 2017: Post-Movie Discussion

Love & Justice Symposium 2017: Remembering our Stories

Love & Justice Symposium 2017: External Partners

2016 HEAT Symposium Day 2


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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The relationship between law enforcement and the communities they serve must be grounded in trust in order to ensure safety and protection for all. Recent events in California and across the nation have strained this relationship.

As part of Attorney General Kamala D. Harris’ ongoing commitment to identify strategies to strengthen trust between law enforcement and communities, the Department of Justice offered California law enforcement executives a course entitled Principled Policing in November 2015.

Principled Policing was the first Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) -certified course on procedural justice and implicit bias in the nation. Over 50 law enforcement executives from 28 departments across California participated in one-day trainings held in Sacramento and Los Angeles.  

The Department developed the training in partnership with Empower Initiative, Stanford SPARQ, the Oakland and Stockton Police Departments, and the community organization California Partnership for Safer Communities.


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